Wednesday, January 17, 2018
 

notes from Bill Buxton’s talk at CHI2008

you have to have your feet in the mud, but your head in the clouds. “Feet in the mud” is being able to do wood working or soldering or something physical, but “head in the clouds” is a knack for abstract thought.

Nothing that transforms our culture is brand new. It always takes twenty years. That means that anything that comes out in the next ten years that is amazing has already been around for ten years. See: the long nose of innovation

Walter Dorwin Teague was a designer around 1926 to 1930. He created the Beau Brownie camera in 1930 that came out in different colors and really tactile materials that were beautiful to touch and look at. Compares it to the Jonathan Ive in 2004 with the iPod Nano’s in different colors. He did not copy it–that’s not what I’m saying. It’s the long nose of innovation, not the long tail. When you have a problem and a design challenge there is a repertoire to draw from.

“The only true voyage of discovery is not to go to new places, but to have other eyes.” Basically, you don’t transform things by doing them from scratch, but by seeing them through different eyes. – Marcel Proust

The only way to engineer the future tomorrow, is to have lived in it yesterday. John Gould and others have taught us that. There are ways to envision the future. Look at the wizard of Oz.

You separate the learning of the craft from the learning of the art. You learn the technique first in traditional art before you get to actually practice art. Then later you get to do the creative part where you can break every rule. When you mature, you get to put them together.

via Bill Buxton

 

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A research blog about interaction, design research, urban informatics, ambient computing, visualisation, emerging technologes and their impact on the built environment.

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This is a blog by Gonzalo Garcia-Perate a PhD researcher at The Bartlett, looking at adaptive ambient information in urban spaces.

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